BEQ Crossword Answers: We Have Achieved Peak Puzzle

BEQ Crossword: We Have Achieved Peak Puzzle (11/09/2017)

1002wehaveachievedpeakpuzzle-solve

Constructed By: Brendan Emmett Quigley
Edited By: Brendan Emmett Quigley
Source: Obtain and Play This Puzzle Here
Theme: Peak Puzzles
There are 4 additional clues given with the clue [Puzzle] under a heading of PEAK. These are names of puzzles that are formed in a “mountain peak” style starting from the clue number given. They are marked in colors on the grid.

Glenn’s Time: 19 minutes (paper).
Glenn’s Errors: 1 dumb error.

While I have no interest in doing a full blog post on this puzzle, I thought it might be useful to post some answers. I mocked up the grid from the original PDF into Across Lite to make it look good. The numbering will be off from what BEQ originally had, but it should be useful if anyone wants to see the puzzle’s answers and how the gimmick works.

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BEQ Crossword Review: Party Line

BEQ Crossword: Party Line (09/28/2017)

BEQ-20170928-Party-Line

Constructed By: Brendan Emmett Quigley
Edited By: Brendan Emmett Quigley
Source: Obtain and Play This Puzzle Here
Theme: Pub Crawl.
There’s a maze between 17-A and 65-A of drinks as indicated in the two clues:

  • 17-A. [Excursion that starts at square 18 and moves through the grid one square at a time up, down, left or right, never crossing its path, and ends somewhere in 65-Across] – PUB CRAWL
  • 65-A. [How you might feel after consuming everything in the path starting from square 18 (shouldn’t have had a couple on the fourth stop)] – HUNG OVER
  • The path is: CHAMPAGNE, SCOTCH, SANGRIA, PALE ALES, MARTINI, SAKE. (The couple on the fourth stop indicates the plural.)

Glenn’s Time: 15 minutes (paper), 2 or 3 minutes on the maze.
Glenn’s Errors: 0

(Quality) Rating: 3.5 stars/5 stars.
Review:
Brendan Emmett Quigley puts out a lot of good content in a number of places, including his own web site, and this one is no exception. Quigley also provides a number of more contemporary and less formal references than the norm in these puzzles. While crosswords have proved that I am probably sheltered compared to most in what I have to guess, most of the references here are usually interesting in what I didn’t know, if not always entirely fresh and exciting.

As with his other puzzles, this one is a well-done and constructed grid, albeit much easier than advertised. While there’s not too much that’s overly interesting in the fill, the maze adds a certain novelty to this grid.

For all the puzzles I’ve done from this site, it is definitely a recommended source in case you are looking for a good puzzle to do on Monday (themeless) and Thursday (themed).

Unfamiliar/Interesting Stuff To Me:
50-A. [Jewel-_____ Drug] – OSCO. This is a supermarket chain throughout Illinois, Iowa, and Indiana. The answer was kind of interesting, as I used to have an Osco Drug around me a long time ago, but evidently it got shut down.

70-A. [Unit of perceived loudness] – PHON. Found this one interesting since one would expect “decibel” here. More or less, a phon is as defined here (confusing?). From what I gather though, the unit was devised as a way to make frequency a non-factor in the loudness of sounds (for example a 60db sound sounds louder at 1000Hz than at 500Hz). Confused even more yet?

56-D. [Vermont ski resort] – OKEMO. This would be the place. Of course, I’ve never heard of it because I’m not from the area.


Until later!

Fireball Crosswords Review: Double Trouble

Fireball Crosswords Review : “Double Trouble” (2017-09-21)

Fireball-20170921-Double-Trouble

Constructed By: Paul Coulter
Edited By: Peter Gordon
Source: By Subscription Only: See page here.
Theme: Double Letter Move.
In each theme entry, a double letter is moved to another position to form another double letter pair.

  • 17-A. [Show affection to honorees on Father’s Day?] – BUSS PAS. (from “Bus Pass”)
  • 23-A. [Farm bundling device invented by philanthropist Andrew?] – MELLON BALER. (from “Melon Baller”)
  • 37-A. [Cage for an Olympian?] – GOD COOP. (from “Good Cop”)
  • 50-A. [Flat paints sold in metric volumes?] – LITER MATTES. (from “Litter Mates”)
  • 62-A. [Put money on a Portland college?] – BET REED. (from “Beet Red”)

Glenn’s Time: 70 minutes.
Glenn’s Errors: 0.

(Quality) Rating: 3.5 stars/5 stars.
Review:
Fireball Crosswords is a by subscription-only crossword service provided by Peter Gordon, that features puzzles either constructed or edited by him. They often feature unique and creative things. However, the primary pitch is the difficulty as indicated on the website’s pitch: “The puzzles are hard. How hard? If you have to ask, too hard for you.” One will indeed find difficulty in these puzzles, often due to the cluing which is generally far more oblique than the norm, though not as difficult as some other examples people can find, such as the Newsday Saturday Stumper or some of the New York Times Friday or Saturday puzzles.

This puzzle provides a fairly good solve, albeit with some pedestrian entries. While locating theme entries that fit the particular rule must have been difficult, the results of the theme are a bit underwhelming from an entertainment standpoint. A fair number of the fill entries are interesting, but a fair number are a bit pedestrian, too. While a good solve, it’s hard to commend this grid as a stellar one.

Unfamiliar/Interesting Stuff To Me:

23-A. [Farm bundling device invented by philanthropist Andrew?] – MELLON BALER. Read about Andrew Mellon.

30-A. [1995 Jane Smiley novel set at an agricultural college] – MOO. The novel described.

36-A. [Extra month between June and July in the International Fixed Calendar] – SOL. I wasn’t aware of the International Fixed Calendar. This calendar is a proposal made in 1902 to change the calendar to 13 28-day months. The 13th month was named Sol and inserted between June and July.

41-A. [Scratchy, e.g.] – CAT. This would be Itchy & Scratchy as seen on the Simpsons.

24-D. [Vape] – E-CIG. Awkward, but true. The word is defined as a noun as well as a verb. “Vaping the vape.” is a valid sentence. Weird.

32-D. [Second-brightest stars in constellations] – BETAS. In the naming of stars, specifically the Bayer designation, stars that haven’t been given proper names (e.g. Polaris, Rigel), the constellation they belonged to as a possessive was prefixed by a Greek letter was used. For example, Beta Centauri. The order of the letters is dictated by the brightness of the star.

60-D. [Arctic explorer John] – RAE. John Rae was a 19th century Scottish explorer that explored northern Canada.


Until next time! Feedback about what to consider looking at or talking about, or questions (if I can answer them) are always welcome!

Chronicle of Higher Education Review: Initial Finishes

Chronicle of Higher Education Review : “Initial Finishes” (2017-09-22)

CHE-20170922-Initial-Finishes
Constructed By: Randall J. Hartman
Edited By: Brad Wilber
Source: CHE Website.

Theme: Initial Finishes
Each theme answer has a phrase in the beginning and a phonetic word at the end that initializes the previous two words.

    • 17-A. [Award won by a documentary about volcanologists in Sicily?] – MT ETNA EMMY
    • 26-A. [Wedding-reception hiree who hits on the bride?] – DON JUAN DEEJAY
    • 42-A. [Navy engineer who bellyaches about his job?] – CRY BABY SEABEE
    • 55-A. [Harvard, when it’s hot?] – IN VOGUE IVY

Glenn’s Time: 48 minutes (paper).
Glenn’s Errors: DNF, 2 errors. Spelt 27-D wrong (OPIE), guessed wrong on 28-D (NIEL). Couldn’t hazard a spelling on 41-D, couldn’t guess on 45-A or 50-A.

(Quality) Rating: 3.5 stars/5 stars.
Review:
The Chronicle of Higher Education features a weekly puzzle throughout the fall and spring semesters and a biweekly puzzle throughout the summer semester. They often feature academic knowledge or technical topics to a greater degree than the average puzzle, and often are far more technically clued than the average puzzle. This is consistent with the target audience of the CHE – college administrators and professors. While these puzzles are often well constructed, the knowledge required will frustrate beginning or medium solvers. To that end, a degree of patience or a willingness to look up some things often required to fill in these puzzles.

This particular puzzle is an fair example of a CHE puzzle. We have an interesting theme, which must have taken a little work to obtain, but a little loopy in parts (though most theme entries involving strange constructions of words are like that). The fill is mostly interesting, though a bit stilted in parts. Overall, this grid is a pretty decent solve.

Unfamiliar/Interesting Stuff To Me:

30-A. [Vessel included in the so-called “Plan Z”] – UBOAT. Plan Z is the German plan for reconstruction of the navy in the run-up to World War II.

50-A. [England’s Newcastle upon _____] – TYNE. Most of these are pure guesses.

12-D. [When Juliet asks “Wherefore thou art Romeo?”] – ACT II. Typically a throw-away clue/answer in grids.

13-D. [Cumberland Gap trailblazer] – BOONE. This would be Daniel Boone and this would be his trailblazing ground.

27-D. [Officer who busts Arlo for littering in “Alice’s Restaurant”] – OBIE. Read all about it. While it’s famous and all that, it’s really more spoken word than a song. Interesting though.

28-D. [Writer who turned down an invitation to play the title role in 1962’s “Dr. No”] – NOEL COWARD. This is he. Never heard of him.

41-D. [“The Umbrellas of Cherbourg” co-star] – DENEUVE. This would be her.

45-D. [Save-the-theater animated film of 2016] – SING. Never heard of it.


In the meantime, feel free to leave a comment on any of the posts made or any suggestions on puzzles to look at or topics to handle. Until later!

Jonesin’ Crosswords Review: Grid Expectations

Jonesin’ Crosswords Review : “Grid Expectations” (2017-09-19)

Jonesin-20170919-Grid-Expectations

Constructed By: Matt Jones
Edited By: Matt Jones
Source: Play Online. PUZ File here.
Theme: None
Glenn’s Time: 39 minutes (paper).
Glenn’s Errors: 0

(Quality) Rating: 3.5 stars/5 stars.
Review:
I am aware of Matt Jones only through some of the other lists out there. He puts a puzzle of varying difficulty out on Tuesday on his site, and I’m guessing other places possibly too. I’ve done a number of them and always found them quite entertaining. Jones’ puzzles have a good amount of pop culture, often some pretty slick references. Even though, there’s often no idea of what is in the offering each week as far as difficulty goes.

In this puzzle, Matt Jones provides one of his occasional themeless grids (Difficulty 4/6). The construction is very clean, with a fair number of decent entries. While some of it is contrived, most of what is presented is pretty easy to figure out, and the trivia/proper names doesn’t overwhelm the grid as it does in many cases. A pleasant enjoyable solve.

Unfamiliar/Interesting Stuff To Me:
17-A. [Fisher-Price toy that teaches animal noises] – SEENSAY. Most of us will remember the See ‘n Say from our childhoods. For whatever animal it was pointed at, you would pull the cord and then get a recording back (“The cow says… moooo”).

34-A. [Bygone brand of “flavor bits”] – BACOS. This was a brand of salad topping (and other things) made out of cooked bacon that was chopped up and dried.

41-A. [Old Dead Sea Kingdom] – EDOM. In the course of the Bible we find that Edom is the country that was founded by the descendants of Jacob’s brother Esau. The territory involved is now separated between Israel and Jordan.

4-D. [Old detergent brand with a self-descriptive name] – RINSO. Rinso was one of the first mass-marketed soap powders for use with washing machines.

23-D. [Dr. of old pajamas] – DENTON. This is a well-known brand of blanket sleepers or footie pajamas.

24-D. [Series gaps] – LACUNAS. A lacuna is a missing portion or gap.

31-D. [Author Christoper whose writing inspired “Cabaret”] – ISHERWOOD. This is he.

33-D. [French Revolution radical] – JACOBIN. This is a member of a political movement during the French Revolution.

34-D. [Ricky Ricardo’s theme song] – BABALU.

36-D. [“Possession” actress Isabelle] – ADJANI. This is her.


Until next time!

Chronicle of Higher Education Review: United Nations

Chronicle of Higher Education Review : “United Nations” (2017-09-15)

CHE-20170915-United Nations
Constructed By: Gordon Johnson
Edited By: Brad Wilber
Source: CHE Website.

We have a note with this one: Constructor Gordon Johnson has worked for the United Nations for almost 25 years and currently is based in Bangkok as the environment team leader for the UN Development Program in the Asia-Pacific region.

Theme: Common Ground
Each theme answer mates two countries together.

  • 17-A. [[A central Asian and an African find common ground]] – TAJIKISTANZANIA (Tajikistan and Tanzania)
  • 26-A. [[An African and a European find common ground]] – NIGERMANY (Niger and Germany)
  • 48-A. [[A Micronesian and a South American find common ground]] – NAURUGUAY (Nauru and Uruguay)
  • 62-A. [[Two Central Americans find common ground]] – NICARAGUATEMALA (Nicaragua and Guatemala)

Glenn’s Time: 30 minutes (paper).
Glenn’s Errors: 2 dumb errors.

(Quality) Rating: 3.0 stars/5 stars.
Review:
The Chronicle of Higher Education features a weekly puzzle throughout the fall and spring semesters and a biweekly puzzle throughout the summer semester. They often feature academic knowledge or technical topics to a greater degree than the average puzzle, and often are far more technically clued than the average puzzle. This is consistent with the target audience of the CHE – college administrators and professors. While these puzzles are often well constructed, the knowledge required will frustrate beginning or medium solvers. To that end, a degree of patience or a willingness to look up some things often required to fill in these puzzles.

This particular puzzle is an atypical example. We have a puzzle with a theme that’s been pretty shopworn over the years – to the point that a lot of this puzzle was deja-vu. And it was (Wall Street Journal, New York Times) – these are puzzles I found with these entries. As I don’t have access to a crossword catalog, I’m sure there’s many more with this theme – but many more answers. The fill leaves something to be desired as well.

Given that (again) I don’t know entirely how experienced this constructor is (He shows 2 NYT puzzles), I can’t say too much. But overall, this grid is a pretty serviceable one, although not too interesting in very many facets. My reaction to this is “Meh” on about every level.

Unfamiliar/Interesting Stuff To Me:

29-D. [Spiral-horned African antelope] – NYALA. This is a nyala.

59-D. [Like goji berry plants] – CANY. An adjective of the word CANE, like sugar cane.

In the meantime, feel free to leave a comment on any of the posts made or any suggestions on puzzles to look at or topics to handle. Until later!

Washington Post Crossword Review: Named Names

Washington Post Crossword Review : “Named Names” (2017-09-09)

WaPo-20170910-NamedNames
Constructed By: Evan Birnholz
Edited By: Evan Birnholz
Source: Play Online. PUZ File here.
Theme: Verbal First Names
For all the theme answers, a famous name of reality or story is turned into a verb.

  • 23-A. [Actor with a buff physique?] – JACKED NICHOLSON (Jack Nicholson)
  • 35-A. [Film director whose money was stolen?] – ROBBED REINER (Rob Reiner)
  • 53-A. [Famed martial artist, after he gets thrown out?] – CHUCKED NORRIS (Chuck Norris)
  • 64-A. [Stage character with a pale face?] – BLANCHED DUBOIS (Blanche Dubois)
  • 72-A. [Former NBC newsman, when he gets high?] – STONED PHILLIPS (Stone Phillips)
  • 87-A. [Former variety show host, when he gets tossed in the air?] – FLIPPED WILSON (Flip Wilson)
  • 101-A. [Gemini 12 astronaut, after he’s had a few beers?] – BUZZED ALDRIN (Buzz Aldrin)
  • 116-A. [Literary character who also has a buff physique?] – RIPPED VAN WINKLE (Rip Van Winkle)

Glenn’s Time: 30 minutes (paper).
Glenn’s Errors: 0.

(Quality) Rating: 2.5 stars/5 stars.
Review:
The Washington Post offers an original 21×21 puzzle on Sundays as written by Evan Birnholz. Often, these can contain more current pop culture references and occasionally some other different things.

This provides an average example, if a bit pedestrian. We have a theme where a famous figure has a first name turned into a verb in reference to the puzzle. 21×21 puzzles often have a certain sloggish quality to them, and this theme has a certain boring quality – albeit pretty straight forward when it was figured out. The clues were very clearly written and a lot of the fill was pretty straightforward. While boring in content, the quick solve mitigated the chance to get bored over this one.

Unfamiliar/Interesting Stuff To Me:

21-A. [Action film?] – PORNO. Probably the best clue of the bunch.


Until next time, whenever that happens!

Wall Street Journal Crossword Review: A Higher Power

Wall Street Journal Crossword Review : “A Higher Power” (2017-09-08)

WSJ-20170908-A Higher Power
Constructed By:
Marie Kelly (Mike Shenk)
Edited By: Mike Shenk
Source: Play Online. PUZ File here.
Theme: This is a meta puzzle, so none…Mostly.
For this meta puzzle, we are given the task of coming up with a school subject. Given the title, “A Higher Power”, we can guess that maybe arithmetic powers have something to do with this. 34-A & 37-A jump out at us indicating a parallel plan: Perfect Squares, which are integers squared. We start with 1 and look at the positions throughout the grid and get ALGEBRA as our answer.

Glenn’s Time: 44 minutes (paper). About 2-3 minutes on the meta.
Glenn’s Errors: 0.

(Quality) Rating: 3.5 stars/5 stars.
Review:
The Wall Street Journal has offered puzzles six days a week since late 2015, progressing in difficulty from Monday to Thursday, a meta puzzle on Friday, and then a 21×21 on Saturday. There is a typically level degree of difficulty for each day, with a few occasional interesting surprises. This makes it an excellent puzzle set to consider doing if you are looking for something that will occasionally get beyond the typical USA Today or Los Angeles Times puzzle.

This provides a good typical example of a Friday puzzle. On Fridays, the WSJ runs meta puzzles, which has a item that is requested. The solver then uses some property of either the puzzle or the clues in order to come up with the answer. Usually, determining any theme can be useful to solve the meta.

Otherwise, this puzzle functions as a themeless grid. While it has a few interesting entries, a few others are on the dishwater dull side, especially from the cluing perspective. While I appreciate that meta grids have a certain number of constraints, there really aren’t too many here where some more interesting entries could have been used. Overall, this was a relatively decent solve, but not an overly entertaining one.

Unfamiliar/Interesting Stuff To Me:

22-A. [Funny fellow] – WIT. It turns out it can describe the person with such qualities. So, “the wit has wit” seems to be a perfectly good sentence. Ah, the vagaries of English.

38-A. [Stage direction] – EXEUNT. This is a word that is used in written plays to indicate the exit of multiple characters off of stage.

39-A. [Dutch town known for its pottery] – DELFT. Delft is a town known for many things, including pottery. The pottery produced in Delft is known as Delftware or Delft Blue. While I’m sure there’s imitations, chances are anything you see that is white/ceramic with blue inscriptions or patterns, it probably has some origin in Delft.

3-D. [Sixth in line of succession to the British throne] – ANDREW. This would be Prince Andrew, the Duke of York. An example of a throw-away clue to a dishwater dull answer with no constraint, and a pure guess for most of us.

11-D. [“City juice,” in diner lingo] – TAP WATER. Another one that struck me as odd. A fill-in and “well okay?”.

28-D. [49ers wide receiver Taylor] – TRENT. Another throw-away clue that could have been much more interesting than this, and again a pure guess for the most of us I’m sure (I never heard of him). Beyond the wide receiver and some rivers and place names, we could have stuck to football and went with Trent Dilfer, or Trent Green (both far more known). Or go with Trent Lott the politician. Or Trent Reznor the musician. Or the Council of Trent.

33-D. [Database programming lang.] – SQL. Good technical clue, though I’m a bit surprised something like this would show up in a mainstream crossword in most cases. A bit forgiven though for the constraint of the Q in the meta reveal, though I wonder how many would know of this?

34-D. [Pakistani city near the end of the Khyber Pass] – PESHAWAR. This is Peshawar, which came into consciousness with all the conflicts in Afghanistan as it is a border town.


Until next time, whenever that happens!

Wall Street Journal Crossword Review: Literary Surroundings

Wall Street Journal Crossword Review : “Literary Surroundings” (2017-09-09)

WSJ-20170909-LiterarySurroundings
Constructed By: Roger & Kathy Wienberg
Edited By: Mike Shenk
Source: Play Online. PUZ File here.
Theme: Book Ends
For all the starred (*) theme answers, as indicated in 102-A, BOOK can precede or follow each half of the answer.

  • 27-A. [Golf ball striker] – CLUB FACE (Book Club and Facebook)
  • 29-A. [Magazine lead] – COVER STORY (Book Cover and Story Book)
  • 42-A. [Galaxy, e.g.] – SMART PHONE (Book Smart and Phone Book)
  • 45-A. [Task for TSA agents] – BAG CHECK (Book Bag and Check Book)
  • 63-A. [Envelope inscription] – RETURN ADDRESS (Book Return and Address Book)
  • 83-A. [Good sport’s forte] – FAIR PLAY (Book Fair and Play Book)
  • 85-A. [Wimbledon highlight] – TITLE MATCH (Book Title and Match Book)
  • 100-A. [“And that’s that”] – CASE CLOSED (Book Case and Closed Book)

Glenn’s Time: 41 minutes (paper).
Glenn’s Errors: 0.

(Quality) Rating: 2.5 stars/5 stars.
Review:
The Wall Street Journal has offered puzzles six days a week since late 2015, progressing in difficulty from Monday to Thursday, a meta puzzle on Friday, and then a 21×21 on Saturday. There is a typically level degree of difficulty for each day, with a few occasional interesting surprises. This makes it an excellent puzzle set to consider doing if you are looking for something that will occasionally get beyond the typical USA Today or Los Angeles Times puzzle.

This provides a good typical example of a Saturday puzzle. We have the potential of a tricker theme on this day along with harder clues and we get that here, mostly. In this one, we have theme entries which are compound words. Each part can be taken to mean another thing with the addition of BOOK to either the beginning or end. The theme entries are very consistent, although lacking in flair. The fill is mostly good here, but pedestrian. There is a distinctly small amount of junk in the fill as usually expected for 21×21 grids, but a little questionable in spots. Given that 21×21 grids can be a slog to solve in a lot of ways by themselves, this one leaves little incentive to solve it, although the lower difficulty of this one compensates for any potential boredom.

Unfamiliar/Interesting Stuff To Me:

19-A. [Projecting bay window] – ORIEL. New to me.

33-A. [Filbert trees] – HAZELS. A filbert is the nut produced by certain kinds of hazel trees.

52-A. [Hebrew for “to the skies”] – EL AL. Most of us know this as the Israeli airline. This was painted on the plane that took the first Israeli president somewhere, and was considered the inaugural flight. The word means upwards (towards up).

82-A. [Fray] – SET-TO. The word means a brief or sharp fight or argument.

90-A. [Chef’s topper] – TOQUE. A toque is a hat with either a narrow brim or none at all.

87-D. [Pieces for coloraturas] – ARIOSOS. Coloratura (literally Italian for “coloring”) is a word used to describe elaborate melody in vocal singing. Arioso is a vocal piece that occurs in an opera.


Until next time, whenever that happens!

BEQ Crossword #984 Review: THE BRADY BUNCH

BEQ Crossword #984: THE BRADY BUNCH (09/07/2017)

BEQ-20170907-THEBRADYBUNCH
Constructed By: Brendan Emmett Quigley
Edited By: Brendan Emmett Quigley
Source: Obtain and Play This Puzzle Here
Theme: The Patriots …
The Patriots played tonight, hence the reference. (Edited)

  • 18-A. [Mystical kneecap?] – PATELLA ENCHANTED (Ella Enchanted)
  • 29-A & 35-A. [Drinker’s periodical] – BAR PATRONS MAGAZINE (Barron’s Magazine)
  • 54-A. [Drink made by steeping Indian bread?] – CHAPATI TEA (chai tea)
  • 64-A. [Axiom that emphasizes your male friends over pity?] – BROS BEFORE PATHOS (Bros before hos)

Glenn’s Time: 35 minutes (paper).
Glenn’s Errors: 3 dumb errors.

(Quality) Rating: 3.0 stars/5 stars.
Review:
Brendan Emmett Quigley puts out a lot of good content in a number of places, including his own web site, and this one is no exception. Quigley also provides a number of more contemporary and less formal references than the norm in these puzzles. While crosswords have proved that I am probably sheltered compared to most in what I have to guess, most of the references here are usually interesting in what I didn’t know, if not always entirely fresh and exciting.

This is not a must-play in the sense that the theme entries are a little underwhelming in the hilarity that ensues, as well as some of the fill. But as his other puzzles, it provides an interesting crossword trip for the time it lasts and fits the level of challenge that he advertises.

For all the puzzles I’ve done from this site, it is definitely a recommended source in case you are looking for a good puzzle to do on Monday (themeless) and Thursday (themed).

Unfamiliar/Interesting Stuff To Me:
1-A. [Bridge to Notre Dame] – PONT. This is the bridge in question.

24-A. [Art Spiegelman masterwork] – MAUS. This is Art Spiegelman’s graphic novel as published in 1991.

41-A. [Super Bowl III winning coach Weeb] – EWBANK. He was the head coach of the New York Jets, who won Super Bowl III.

68-A. [“Modern Family” actor Gould and namesakes] – NOLANS. This refers to Nolan Gould. Can’t say I ever heard of him (the pop culture issue that plagued a clue in the previous puzzle), nor I watch Modern Family. Evidently this is the only thing he is known for. A little unwieldly, and a pure guess on my part.

12-D. [When the office scenes of “Glengarry Glen Ross” occur] – ACT II. A throwaway clue/answer, and one of my peeves. At least you always know what it’s going to be without too much trouble.

25-D. [Grp. that can lower your Sprint bill] – AAA. The American Automobile Association offers a number of discounts and rewards with membership, including probably a discount on your phone bill with Sprint. Again a odd throwaway.

33-D & 36-A. [Showstopper?] – TIVO BOX. Again a little weird, by including the BOX there (instead of maybe DVR).


Until later!